Washington D.C. Sex Offender Records

What is a Sex Offender?

A sex offender is someone who has been pronounced guilty of committing or attempting to commit a sex offense. A sex offender is a person who has pled guilty to a sex crime, including the following:

  • Unlawful imprisonment of a victim below eighteen years of age if the offender is not the victim’s parent
  • Kidnapping a victim under eighteen years of age if the offender is not the victim’s parent
  • Sexual abuse of a victim under eighteen years of age.
  • Sexual conduct with a minor
  • Sexual assault
  • Sexual assault of a spouse
  • Child molestation
  • Continuous sexual abuse of a child
  • Taking a child for the purpose of prostitution.
  • Child prostitution
  • Child sex trafficking
  • Commercial sexual exploitation of a minor.
  • Sexual exploitation of a minor.
  • Luring a minor for sexual exploitation
  • A second or subsequent violation of indecent exposure to a person who is under fifteen years of age.
  • A second or subsequent violation of public sexual indecency to a minor who is under fifteen years of age
  • A third or subsequent violation of indecent exposure.
  • A third or subsequent violation of public sexual indecency.
  • Aggravated luring of a minor for sexual exploitation.
  • Sexual extortion if the victim is under fifteen years of age.

Who is Considered a Sex Offender in the District of Columbia?

According to the 22-4001 of the District of Columbia code, a sex offender is anyone who lives, works, or attends school in the state and has committed a registration offense on or after July 11, 2000. This also applies to individuals convicted of a registration offense, under supervision, or required to register under the law on or after July 11, 2000, within or outside the state. Examples of a registration offense include sexual abuse of a minor, enticing a child, sexual abuse of a patient or client, and more.

What Types of Sex Offenders Exist in the District of Columbia

The District of Columbia classifies sex offenders into 3 categories: Class A, Class B, and Class C. The different categories are based on the severity of sex offenses and the duration of registration requirements.

Class A Sex Offender

Class A sex offenders are individuals convicted of severe sex offenses and not due to the reason of insanity. Under the District of Columbia code, the registration requirement for Class A sex offenders is lifetime registration. Examples of such sex offenses include:

  • First-degree sexual abuse
  • Second-degree sexual abuse
  • Rape
  • Forcible sodomy
  • First-degree child sexual abuse of persons under 12 years
  • Carnal knowledge (statutory rape) of a child under 12 years
  • Murder committed before, during, or after engaging or attempting to engage in a sexual act, sexual contact, or rape
  • Manslaughter is committed before, during, or after engaging or attempting to engage in a sexual act, sexual contact, or rape.
  • Sodomy committed against a child under 12 years
  • Assault to commit any of the aforementioned act
  • Attempt to commit any of the aforementioned Acts
  • Conspiring to commit any of the aforementioned Acts
  • Two separate convictions for registration offenses
  • A conviction for committing registration offenses against two or more victims

Class B Sex Offender

Class B sex offenders are individuals convicted of sex offenses against a minor under 18 years of age and not due to insanity. Under the District of Columbia code, the registration requirement for Class B sex offenders is 10 years. Examples of such sex offenses include:

  • Indecent acts on a child
  • Enticing a child
  • Third-degree sex abuse
  • Fourth-degree sex abuse
  • Misdemeanor sex abuse
  • First-degree child sexual abuse
  • Second-degree child sex abuse
  • Carnal knowledge
  • Sodomy against a minor
  • Lewd, indecent or obscene acts
  • Sexual performance using a minor
  • Incest
  • Obscenity
  • Prostitution
  • Pandering
  • Assault (unwanted sexual touching)
  • Threatening to commit a sexual offense
  • Kidnapping
  • First or second-degree burglary to commit a sexual offense
  • Assault to commit any of the above offenses
  • Attempt to commit any of the aforementioned offenses
  • Conspiracy to commit any of the aforementioned offenses
  • Any offense against a minor for which the offender agreed in a plea agreement to be subject to Sex Offender Registration
  • A conviction for a similar offense in another jurisdiction
  • First or second-degree sexual abuse against a resident of a hospital, treatment facility, or other institution
  • First or second-degree sexual abuse of a patient or client

Class C Sex Offender

District of Columbia Class C sex offenders includes individuals convicted of sex crimes against a person who is 18 years or above. The following are examples of Class C offenses:

  • Third or fourth-degree sexual abuse
  • First or second-degree burglary to commit a sexual offense
  • Kidnapping to commit a sexual offense
  • Threatening to commit a sex offense
  • Assault to commit any of the aforementioned criminal offenses
  • Attempt to commit any of the above criminal offense
  • Conspiracy to commit any of the aforementioned offenses
  • An offense for which the offender agreed in a plea agreement to be subject to Sex Offender Registration
  • A conviction for a similar offense in another jurisdiction

What are the Sex Offender Laws in the District of Columbia?

Several laws in the District of Columbia govern the registration, tracking, sharing of sex offender’s information as well as penalties for sex offenses. The sex offender laws include:

  • Sex Offender Registration Act 1999
  • Megan's Law

Sex Offender Registration Act 1999

The Sex Offender Registration Act 1999 requires that individuals convicted for sex offenses are to register in the District of Columbia, as long as they live, work, or school in the state. The Registration Act allows law enforcement agencies to monitor and track sex offenders in the community. The duration of registration for a sex offender is often determined by the severity of the offense committed and the level of threat they pose to the community.

Megan's Law

Similar to other states in the country, the District of Columbia has its version of Megan’s law. The law requires that all states provide public access to sex offender information within their jurisdictions. Megan’s Law is named after Megan Kanka, a seven-year-old who was abducted and murdered by a registered sex offender on July 29, 1994. The District of Columbia sex offender registry is maintained by the Metropolitan Police Department.

What is the District of Columbia Sex Offender Registry?

The District of Columbia sex offender registry is a database that contains information about sex offenders living, working, or schooling in the state. The registry allows public access to sex offender information to enhance public safety. This information includes the sex offender’s name, nickname, physical description, gender, date of birth, the offense of conviction, date of conviction, and more.

Interested members of the public may also obtain public record information from third-party websites. These privately owned sites typically host data culled from public databases and repositories. However, the information available on third-party sites may vary since they are independent of government sources. In order to use a third-party site, record seekers may be required to provide all or some of the following information:

  • The full name on the record of choice
  • The last known or current address of the named individual
  • The address of the requestor

Who Runs the District of Columbia Sex Offender Registry?

The Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia is responsible for maintaining a statewide sex offender registry. The department in collaboration with local law enforcement agencies compiles all records of sex offenders across the state. Convicted persons must provide up-to-date information with the Metropolitan Police Department or the local law enforcement agency in their city or county.

Who Can View the District of Columbia Sex Offender Registry?

Any interested member of the public can search or view the sex offender registry in the District of Columbia. The sex offender information in the registry is available to the public to enhance public safety. However, interested persons are not allowed to use information gathered from the registry to harass or threaten sex offenders. Individuals who do so will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

How Long Do Sex Offenders Have to Register in the District of Columbia?

Sex offenders in the District of Columbia are to register for 10 years after they have been released, placed on probation, or parole. However, certain offenders may require lifetime registration depending on the severity of sex crimes committed.

Can a Sex Offender Live With Their Family in the District of Columbia?

Sex offenders in the District of Columbia can live with their family members. Although, certain sex offenders may be prohibited from living together with their families depending on the threat they pose. Such decisions are on a case-by-case basis and usually for sex offenders under the department of corrections supervision.

Do Sex Offenders Have to Notify Neighbors in the District of Columbia?

Sex offenders are not required to notify their neighbors of their status. However, sex offenders in the District of Columbia must register with the local law enforcement agency in their city or county of residence. Also, they are to inform the law enforcement agency of any change in their registration information e.g. address, name, etc. Sex offenders are to verify their registration information periodically as well as inform the law enforcement agency before moving out of the state.

Do Sex Offenders Have to Put Up a Sign in Their Yard in the District of Columbia?

Sex offenders in the District of Columbia are not mandated to put a sign in their yard. However, certain sex offenders or sexual psychopaths may be restricted from living in a community depending on the court order. Such sex offenders may be required to wear an electronic monitoring device for the duration of their parole or probation. Also, local law enforcement agencies provide information on registered sex offenders in the community.

How Close Can a Sex Offender Live to a School in the District of Columbia?

A sex offender in the District of Columbia can live close to any school in the state. There are no specific state laws that restrict sex offenders from living anywhere in the state. However, certain sex offenders under close supervision may be prohibited from living close to a school or other places that involve children.

Is Public Urination a Sex Offense in the District of Columbia?

Public urination is not considered a sex offense in the District of Columbia. However, public urination is unlawful and classified as disorderly conduct as stated under section 22-1321. Individuals who commit such an offense may be guilty of a misdemeanor. Convicted persons may be fined up to $500, imprisoned for up to 90 days, or both.

Can You Expunge a Sex Offender Charge in the District of Columbia?

Individuals in the District of Columbia who have committed felony offenses as well as misdemeanor sexual abuse and violated the sex offender registration act are ineligible for expungement.

How to Look Up Sex Offenders in District of Columbia

The Metropolitan Police Department maintains an online public registry of sex offenders for the District of Columbia. The online registry only provides information on class A and B sex offenders within the state’s jurisdiction. Sex offender information obtainable in the registry include offender names, nickname, work address, home address, physical description, gender, date of birth, the offense of conviction, date of conviction, place of conviction, case no, class of offense, and more. Interested persons can access sex offender’s information using the name (or nickname) or address search options.

Name or Nickname Search

Interested persons can obtain sex offender information using the name or nickname search option by inputting the offender's last and first name or nickname.

Address Search

Interested members of the public can also access the District of Columbia sex offender information by filling out the offender's address. Using this search type, interested persons can search the address of known offenders.

Note: Interested persons who cannot provide the name (or nickname) or address can also obtain sex offender information using the "List All Offenders" option. Here, interested persons can view all the registered sex offenders in the District of Columbia.

To obtain class C sex offender information, interested persons are to visit the following MPDC Registry Book locations:

1st District (1D)
101 M Street, North West
Washington, DC 20024
Phone: (202) 698-0555

District 1 Substation (1D-1)
500 E Street South East
Washington, DC 20003
Phone: (202) 698-0068
Fax: (202) 727-4028

District 2 (2D)
3320 Idaho Avenue North West
Washington, DC 20016
Phone: (202) 715-7300
Fax: (202) 715-7382

District 3 (3D)
1620 V Street North West
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: (202) 673-6815
Fax: (202) 673-7630

District 4 (4D)
6001 Georgia Avenue North West
Washington, DC 20011
Phone: (202) 715-7400
Fax: (202) 541-5956

District 4 Substation (4D-1)
750 Park Road North West
Washington, DC 20010
Phone: (202) 576-8222
Fax: (202) 576-3350

District 5 (5D)
1805 Bladensburg Road North East
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 698-0150
Fax: (202) 724-8649

District 6 (6D)
100 42nd Street North East
Washington, DC 20019
Phone: (202) 698-0880
Fax: (202) 727-8223

District 6 Substation (6D-1)
2701 Pennsylvania Avenue South East
Washington, DC 20019
Phone: (202) 698-2088
Fax: (202) 727-3810

District 7 (7D)
2455 Alabama Avenue South East
Washington, DC 20020
Phone: (202) 698-1500
Fax: (202) 645-0020

Sex Offender Registry Unit
300 Indiana Avenue North West
Room 3009
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: (202) 727-4407
Fax: (202) 727-0588

Youth Investigation Services
1700 Rhode Island Avenue North East
Washington, DC 20018
Phone: (202) 576-6737
Fax: (202) 576-6561

How to Report a Sex Offender in the District of Columbia

Members of the public can report a sex offender in the District of Columbia by contacting the local law enforcement agency or the Metropolitan Police Department at:

Metropolitan Police Department
300 Indiana Avenue, North West
Room 5059
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: (202) 727-9099
Fax: (202) 727-4106

According to 22-4015 of the District of Columbia code, sex offenders who violate the registration requirements may be fined up to $1,000, or imprisoned for up to 180 days, or both. A second or repeat violation of the registration requirements may result in fines up to $25,000, or imprisoned for up to 5 years, or both.